Coney Island graveyard

Saturday, May 12th, 2012, dawned bright and sunny. This was perfect weather for the planned outing to Coney Island in the Shannon Estuary by Clare Roots Society members who wished to transcribe the graves in the old churchyard there. Eight people departed from Crovraghan pier at 9 a.m. along with local man Fintan Ginnane in his boat "Saoirse". These included Mary Hester, Fiona de Buitleir, Liam Barry, Frank Barry, Clara Hoyne, Larry Brennan and Eric Shaw.
On arrival at the island, the group made their way though the old street of houses, abandoned since the last islanders left in the 1970s,  and past the one-teacher school that had been built in 1937, up a long incline of about a mile to the ruined Church and began to map, photograph, transcribe the gravestones. They recorded and mapped all the gravestone inscriptions, about 12 in total. Apart from one ancient Bullaun Stone, the earliest date found on the stones was 1858.
The group then climbed to the highest point of the island to see the monument erected to the memory of Captain John Foster Fitzgerald, who was killed in a cavalry charge in the Punjab in 1848. The views included the spires of Ennis Cathedral and St. Flannan’s College away to the east, Shannon Airport and the Kerry hills.
Fintan Ginnane had informed the group that there were two flagstones on Deer Island. The group moved across to this island, found the stones and captured one fine inscription of 1832. This proved the link with the grave being that of a cholera victim. The other stone was weathered and no inscription could be found. It was interesting to visit another of the Estuary’s islands.
The group left the second island on a high tide and were back home in time for lunch.
The gravestone recordings are being transcribed and will be presented to Clare Library to go online in accordance with CRS policy. Watch out for these transcriptions which will also be published on www.clarelibrary.ie

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Coney Island looking east up the Fergus river, with Ennis and Clarecastle in the distance. Up to the 1960s, boats brought coal from England and Poland up the river to Clarecastle and timber from Finland and Nova Scotia. It took great skill on the part of the Clarecastle river pilots to bring the boats up and down this tidal river. Passengers were brought down from Clarecastle to Quebec and Boston during the Famine.


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Leaving Coney Island:L Fintan Ginnane, Larry Brennan, Fiona de Buitleir, Mary Hester.  R Clara Hoyne, Eric Shaw, Frank Barry, Liam Barry


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Boat-owner Fintan Ginnane


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Walking up the “street” on Coney Island:L to R: Claire Hester, Fiona de Buitleir, Mary Hester and Clare Hoyne


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 One room, one-teacher school 1937 -1975 with bathing facility

 


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 Coney Island Graveyard:Fintan Ginnane, Clare Hoyne, Fiona de Buitleir, Mary Hester, Eric Shaw, Frank Barry, Liam Barry.



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Punjab Monument 1848 at the top of Coney Island looking south down the river.

Back – Eric Shaw, Fintan Ginnane. Front- Clara Hoyne, Fiona de Buitleir, Larry Brennan, Mary Hester, Liam Barry, Frank Barry.





Canon Island graveyard

Saturday, April 28th, 2012, dawned bright and sunny, if a little breezy. This was perfect weather for the planned outing to Canon Island in the Shannon Estuary by Clare Roots Society members who wished to transcribe the graves in the old abbey there. Six people departed from Kildysart pier at 9 a.m. along with local man Fintan Ginnane in his boat "Saoirse". These included Mary Hester (our thanks to her for her help in organising the trip), Fiona de Buitleir, Liam Barry, Frank Barry, Larry Brennan and Eric Shaw. Many of Fintan's people are buried on Canon Island.

As the group made its way along the creek out to the island, Fintan told pointed out local landmarks and told the history behind them. Everything looked very different from the water. On arrival at the island, the group made their way to the ruined abbey and began to map, photograph, transcribe the gravestones. They recorded and mapped all the gravestone inscriptions in the 12th C Abbey on the island, about 40 in total. Apart from one ancient stone, the earliest date found on the stones was 1816.

Many of the graves were easily legible as they had been protected from the weather by the thick walls of the abbey. Others were more difficult and flour was used to reveal the lettering more clearly. A number of graves which had previously been completely overgrown were revealed by Frank Barry's trusty scythe and their data transcribed.

Fintan's father, P.J Ginnane, arrived and was able to identify some other graves which were unmarked. He showed a place in the abbey where the monks had had a lookout and could keep track of events on the river.  One story goes that the monks saw Cromwell's ships departing down the river. They rang the abbey bell to let people know that the oppressors had left, but the sailors heard the bell ringing, turned around and came back....

The group left the island on a high tide and were back 'on the mainland' in time for lunch.

The gravestone recordings are being transcribed and will be presented to Clare Library to go online in accordance with CRS policy. The group now plans to visit Coney Island in May and transcribe the graves in the small graveyard on that island. Watch out for these transcriptions which will also be published on www.clarelibrary.ie   

CRS Canon Island graveyard visit 28-Apr-2012
The Clare Roots Society team on Canon Island: (L to R)Liam Barry, Eric Shaw, Fiona de Buitléir, Fintan Ginnane (boat owner), Mary Hester, Frank Barry, Larry Brennan
CRS Canon Island visit Abbey entrance group
The intrepid Clare Roots Society gravestone hounds at the entrance to the abbey complex on Canon Island (L to R: Fintan Ginnane, Eric Shaw, Liam Barry, Fíona de Buitléir, Mary Hester, Larry Brennan)

Drumcliffe Cemetery (Calvary Section): update as of 01-May-2012

The Clare Roots Society is continuing its work of photographing, transcribing and publishing details of the burials in Drumcliff Cemetery in Ennis, Co. Clare. The Society, having successfully documented the burials in the Old Cemetery, has now moved across the road and completed the work in the Calvary Section of the new Cemetery. Unfortunately Clare County Council have mislaid 10 years of records within this section of the Cemetery so our work will be of immense value to future generations.

The gravestone inscriptions of 642 Graves have been recorded giving 1802 Burials. In conjunction with Ennis Tidy Towns Committee, a 50-page booklet is with the printers. The main purpose of the booklet is to present a hard copy of the burial records with a number of background details of individuals.

The Clare Roots Society would like to thank the following for their time and effort in helping to provide this very valuable service in documenting and recording the burials in Drumcliff Cemetery: Declan Barron, Frank & Kathleen Barry, Larry Brennan, Nicky Brennan, John & Caroline Bradley, Gerry & Teresa Foley, Clara & Lucy Hoyne, Jennifer Morgan, Gerry & Mary McMahon, Jim O’Connor, Eric & Breda Shaw, Jackie Vaughan.

A disk containing the transcriptions will be formally handed over to Clare Library and to Clare County Council at a function on 17 May 2012, followed by Clare Roots Society’s scheduled talk.

 

You can view our previous work with regard to Drumcliff at:

http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/don_tran/graves/drumcliff_old_graveyard_ennis.htm

Drumcliff Cemetery, Ennis

Our biggest project to date, completed in 2008 with the assistance of a grant from the Heritage Council of Ireland, involved transcription of the gravestones in the old Drumcliff Cemetery. Drumcliff is the major burial ground for Ennis and environs. A group of ten Clare Roots members and a group of school children from the local Ennis National School photographed and transcribed all the graves by hand. The photos and the gravestone information are now available on the Clare Library website at http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/don_tran/graves/drumcliff_old_graveyard_ennis.htm . Following on from experience gained in transcribing the gravestone in Old Drumcliff, the gravestones in a number of other cemeteries in the Ennis area have now been recorded:

Corrovorrin Graveyard, Ennis

In its ongoing activity of recording gravestone inscriptions in Clare, the Clare Roots Society undertook the work in Corrovorrin Cemetery, Ennis in March 2010. A group of volunteers came forward:

- Larry Brennan
- Michael Falvey
- Eric & Breda Shaw
- Frank Barry
- Olive Paradis & Kathleen Ryan
- Jennifer Morgan
- John Bradley
- Donal Fitzpatrick
- Mary & Gerry McMahon

Corrovorrin is a small graveyard surrounded by a rubble stone wall and has an attractive entrance and stile. The gravestones date from the early 1800s. A map showing that there were over 190 graves to be recorded and photographed.

This cemetery is maintained and only a few broken headstones were noted. Many fine examples of stone-cutting were found particularly on the recumbent tombstones, with ornate decoration and lettering. Most of the stones were of local limestone. The volunteers gave second opinions to each other on the interpretation of the wordings and some of the volunteers went back again and again to view the lettering in different lighting conditions. A number of the stones have fallen forward concealing the inscriptions. It is hoped that these will be reset.

The transcriptions are to be found on the Clare County Library website at http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/don_tran/graves/corrovorrin_graveyard_ennis2010.htm

Feenagh Graveyard, Sixmilebridge:

The Clare Roots Society transcribed the gravestones in Feenagh Cemetery, Sixmilebridge in May 2010. The work was handled by Eric & Breda Shaw.

The Society produced a map showing that there were about 50 graves to be recorded and photographed.

Feenagh cemetery is well maintained. Some fine examples of stone-cutting were found particularly on the recumbent tombstones, with ornate decoration and lettering. Most of the stones were of local limestone and date from 1717. They number about 62 and there are almost 100 in unidentified stone grave-markers. That work has now been completed and it is hoped that the findings will be of interest to the local community and to genealogists locally and much further afield. Scattered over the cemetery are rough stones marking the graves of deceased persons. Clare Roots Society wishes to record its gratitude to those volunteers who undertook the work.

The transcriptions are to be found on the Clare County Library website at http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/don_tran/graves/feenagh_graveyard_sixmilebridge.htm

Old Ballysheen Graveyard, Sixmilebridge

The Clare Roots Society transcribed the headstones in Old Ballysheen Cemetery, Sixmilebridge in May 2010. A group of volunteers came forward:

• Eric & Breda Shaw
• Michael McNamara

Michael McNamara generously gave of his time and skills honed from many years of transcribing gravestone inscriptions for the Sliabh Aughty Magazine.

The Society produced a map showing that there were about 170 graves to be recorded and photographed.

Old Ballysheen cemetery is well maintained. Some fine examples of stone-cutting were found particularly on the recumbent tombstones, with ornate decoration and lettering. Most of the stones were of local limestone and date from the 1730s. A small number of stones should be reinstated to preserve them. The volunteers gave second opinions to each other on the interpretation of the wordings and some of the volunteers went back again and again to view the lettering in different lighting conditions.

That work has now been completed and it is hoped that the findings will be of interest to the local community and to genealogists locally and much further afield. Scattered over the cemetery are rough stones marking the graves of deceased persons.

The transcriptions are to be found on the Clare County Library website at http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/don_tran/graves/old_ballysheen_graveyard.htm

Old Doora Graveyard, Ennis:

The Clare Roots Society transcribed the headstones in Old Doora Cemetery, Ennis in March 2010. A group of volunteers came forward:

• Eric & Breda Shaw
• Frank Barry
• Larry Brennan & Michael Falvey

The Society produced a map showing that there were 36 graves to be recorded and photographed.

Old Doora cemetery is well maintained. Some fine examples of stone-cutting were found particularly on the recumbent tombstones, with ornate decoration and lettering. Most of the stones were of local limestone. The volunteers gave second opinions to each other on the interpretation of the wordings and some of the volunteers went back again and again to view the lettering in different lighting conditions.

The transcriptions are to be found on the Clare County Library website at http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/don_tran/graves/old_doora_graveyard_ennis.htm

Killow Graveyard, Clarecastle

Title: Killow Graveyard Headstone Transcriptions
Dates: 1700 to 2008
Place/s: Clareabbey Parish
Source: Transcriptions from Headstones
Donator: The Clare Roots Society

These gravestone inscriptions and photographs of Killow Graveyard were recorded by Frank Barry of the Clare Roots Society over a number of years.

The transcriptions are to be found on the Clare County Library website at http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/don_tran/graves/killow_graveyard_clarecastle.htm

Killone Abbey Graveyard, Ennis:

Clare Roots Society became aware of the wonderful work that had been done at Killone Abbey in cleaning up the cemetery there by the Ballyea Community Group in the latter half of 2008. That work had brought to light many gravestones that had been covered over and the Society decided that it was an opportune time to record the inscriptions on the stones. Volunteers to carry out the work were sought and  the following nine people agreed to take on the task:

- Robert Cullen
- Stephanie Moloney
- Larry Brennan
- Nicky Brennan
- Michael Falvey
- Donal Fitzpatrick
- Patrick Killeen
- Bernie Ryan
- Eric Shaw

A map showing the approximate location of each grave was drawn up and it showed that there were over 300 graves to be recorded and photographed.

Many fine examples of stone-cutting were found particularly on the recumbent tombstones, with ornate decoration and lettering. The fact that these had been covered over by brambles and scrub helped to preserve the lettering. Even so, some of the letters were difficult to decipher and some unusual surnames were discovered. The volunteers gave second opinions to each other on the interpretation of the wordings and some of the volunteers went back again and again to view the lettering in different lighting conditions.

The transcriptions are to be found on the Clare County Library website at http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/don_tran/graves/killone_abbey_graveyard_ennis.htm

Clare Abbey Graveyard, Ennis

Title: Clare Abbey Graveyard Headstone Transcriptions (complete as of July 2008: all legible headstones included)
Dates: 1692 to 2002
Place/s: Drumcliff and Clareabbey parishes
Source: Transcriptions from Headstones
Donator: The Clare Roots Society

These gravestone transcriptions of Clare Abbey Graveyard were recorded by Eric and Breeda Shaw of the Clare Roots Society in July 2008. Many of the gravestones are old, dating from the late 1600s, and have weathered greatly from the time of the last recording, done in the early 1900s by the Association for the Preservation of the Memorials of the Dead.

The transcriptions are to be found on the Clare County Library website at http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/don_tran/graves/clareabbey_graveyard_ennis.htm

Teampall na Déirce Graveyard (Tubber)

Teampall na Déirce graveyard is 10 yards southeast of the Tubber-Ruan road (GPS coordinates N52.97475, W008.91127; Irish OS map square R 91908 38833) in the townland of Shanballysallagh, Kilkeedy Parish. The headstones, 126 in number, were transcribed by Paddy Casey of the Swiss chapter of the Clare Roots Society in July 2007. The transcriptions can be viewed on the website of Clare County Library at http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/don_tran/graves/temple_na_deirce_graveyard_tubber.htm

Kiltolagh Graveyard

The Kiltolagh (also known as Kiltola) graveyard is in the grounds of Kiltolagh church in the townland of Carrowkeel More. It is in the middle of fields on the right of the road from Ruan to Crusheen and cannot be seen from the road. (GPS coordinates N52.93625 W8.95072; Irish OS Discovery map 58, Irish map reference R36095 87673). The headstones, 140 in number, were transcribed by Paddy Casey of the Swiss chapter of the Clare Roots Society in July 2007. The transcriptions can be viewed on the website of Clare County Library at http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/genealogy/don_tran/graves/kiltolagh_graveyard_inchicronan_parish.htm